VARIOUS OTHERS

SOL CALERO, SUSI GELB, ANNA SCHACHINGER, SARA SADIK  
SEPTEMBER 10 - OCTOBER 30, 2021 

IN COLLABORATION WITH
CRÉVECOEUR, PARIS
SOPHIE TAPPEINER, VIENNA

-> TEXT BY MIRIAM STONEY (EN)
-> TEXT VON MIRIAM STONEY (DE)
 















SOL CALERO - COSTA PARAÍSO, 2021, WATERCOLOUR AND COLOR PENCIL ON PAPER, 100 X 70 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CRÉVECOEUR, PARIS




SUSI GELB - CORE 01, 2021, RAMMED EARTH, METAL, LED LIGHT, 42 X 20 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND NIR ALTMAN, MUNICH












ANNA SCHACHINGER - ÄRGER/LÖWE, 2021, OIL ON FROTTE, 27 X 22 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SOPHIE TAPPEINER, VIENNA








ANNA SCHACHINGER - AMSEL, 2021, OIL ON FROTTE, 27 X 22 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SOPHIE TAPPEINER, VIENNA




ANNA SCHACHINGER - JACKE, 2021, OIL ON FROTTE, 27 X 22 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SOPHIE TAPPEINER, VIENNA




ANNA SCHACHINGER - JULI, 2015-2021, OIL ON FROTTE, 27 X 22 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SOPHIE TAPPEINER, VIENNA








SUSI GELB - MELT 01, 2021, TRANSPARENT LED PANEL, VIDEO, LOOP, 100 X 50 X 7 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND NIR ALTMAN, MUNICH












SOL CALERO - EL MALPAÍS, 2021, WATERCOLOUR AND COLOR PENCIL ON PAPER, 90 X 70 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CRÉVECOEUR, PARIS




SOL CALERO - EL MALPAÍS, 2021, WATERCOLOUR AND COLOR PENCIL ON PAPER, 90 X 70 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CRÉVECOEUR, PARIS








ANNA SCHACHINGER - KÄTZCHEN/BEINE, 2021, OIL ON FROTTE, 27 X 22 CM - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SOPHIE TAPPEINER, VIENNA





SARA SADIK - KHTOBTOGONE, 2021, ONE CHANNEL VIDEO 16’9” - COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CRÉVECOEUR, PARIS



Working in a small college art collection in England, one day the curator came to tell me that she had discovered a lost painting behind a bookshelf in the library. The painting depicted a woman from behind, sitting at an easel, painting. It belonged to a genre in which men once painted domestic or intimate scenes, mostly in the industrial North of England. I was especially interested in this woman’s painting, the one in the image, which had not been retrieved with the curator’s discovery. The painting woman and her canvas were still left to dwell in this picture of domesticity, while the dusty frame in which they were confined could now demarcate a work of art once more.

It’s perhaps a strange anecdote to introduce the exhibition of Sol Calero, Susi Gelb, Anna Schachinger, and Sara Sadik for Various Others. However, I am reminded of this painting, the painting within the painting, the painted woman and the painting woman whenever I observe differently gendered constructions of domesticity, sociality and intimacy and their depictions across genres in the arts. In the collaboration with Galerie Crèvecœur, Paris and Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, NIR ALTMAN brings together four artists whose highly personal processes produce various “movements of life”, as Carla Lonzi once put it: “to develop a creative condition in people, to live life in a creative way, not in obedience with the models that society proposes over and over.” That is to say, their works each reorientate the traditional axes of genre – in all of the word’s overlapping meanings.

Rather than routine, which always seemed to me to neutralise the transformative power of steadfast repetition, the notion of iteration accommodates the incremental changes that take place when we perform the same gestures over and over again. The gradual accumulation of meaning in the expanding collection of fabrics, for instance, is implicit within Anna Schachinger’s paintings, becoming more apparent as the different materials enter into dialogues, contradicting and celebrating one another as they act as the picture planes of her paintings. The figurative elements that emerge – the lion, the kitten – do so with the same inevitability as the expressive gestures that appear in lines and bleeding pigments. Working diligently with the frayed edges and the slackness of certain fabrics, Schachinger superimposes an absurd rationality onto the miscellany of errant surfaces, creating objects whose components do not shy away from their origins as “stuff” while taking up a revalorised role at the same time.

The iterative qualities of collecting objects, putting them on display over and over again, can also be observed in Sol Calero’s paintings for the exhibition, transposed from another installation where they formed part of an imagined restaurant setting. I am in awe of the gastronomy industry and its commitment to a certain scenery, which makes it possible for us to take up a temporary stance set apart from responsibility, a sociality uninhibited by pragmatism – aside from the small matter of the bill, of course. These paintings, now framed and hanging on the walls, seem to extract the imagery we are accustomed to seeing as backdrops to our outings. Their recontextualisation in this exhibition is bittersweet, insofar as it also gestures towards the time in which restaurants have been restricted in their activities, due to the pandemic. The dreams of a slumbering restaurant unfold in sketches made as quick as thoughts, which have fled those deserted spaces to seek their viewers in galleries.

Sara Sadik’s video Khtobtogone gives an intimate account of Zine, a working-class member of the Maghrebi diaspora in France. The narrative, inspired by stories from Ahmed Ra’ad Al Hamid and Brian Chiappeta, sees Zine faced with the agonising and contradictory expectations that shape his future. Sadik’s portrayal of Zine is attentive to the tensions exerted by racial, class-based and gendered norms, and how these norms differ contextually. The love that Zine feels for his male friends is incompatible with the love he feels for the woman Bulma, although the words he uses to describe his feelings are not dissimilar in each instance. Created using Grand Theft Auto V, the graphics have an impersonal quality that makes Zine’s vulnerability seem transferable to other identifications, in spite of the specificity of the language, the cultural markers and his personal relationships. The slight glitches in the imagery skip over the hypermasculine behaviour and machoistic violence of typical GTA narratives, as Zine describes nights weeping over heartbreak and his imperative to be better, wanting to be seen by others in a positive light.

Recounting how she came to art criticism, the Italian feminist Carla Lonzi says, “I arrived at art when, having passed through my religious experience, I found in the artistic experience an activity that didn’t require belief ... but satisfied an analogous need.” The ambiguous relation between art and belief seems to animate Susi Gelb’s works for the exhibition, especially in terms of their alchemical references. If belief is not satisfied by art, what is the analogous need that is? Perhaps the suspension of disbelief. The notion that “reality is a fake” seems to me a good prerequisite for making one’s own magic. Casting liquid shapes that float before photographic seascapes, Gelb creates fluid bodies that appear to have emerged from beyond the horizon. A holographic video sculpture observes the hypnotic movements of floating lava, flowing continuously and creating new forms. The schema of visual references in Susi Gelb’s works is permeated with liquids; the inevitability of change encapsulated in the image of waves invokes the sublime quality of repetition, its capacity for creation and destruction – regardless of what we believe.

In writing about these artists’ respective positions, I cannot help but feel as though I have taken up the role of the man painting the woman, quite literally behind her back. Carla Lonzi, who eventually rejected art criticism in favour of more explicitly political feminist activism, bemoaned critics who were “phony” in their relation to art: he or she “trespasses onto things that humanity has toiled at much more and much more deeply, and says his [sic] piece and then he [sic] returns to his [sic] small-minded things.” The more I write, the greater the danger appears that she was right. It is only when the repetition of a certain praxis folds back on itself that we might see the scope for some reinterpretation the second, third or fortieth time around. It is thus that this exhibition reveals the importance of living life in a creative way: while repeating, maintaining and enduring, always allowing oneself to be surprised by the things that happen today, purely because they happened yesterday, and they might well happen tomorrow, too.

Text by Miriam Stoney
<- DOWNLOAD PDF ->


Als ich in einer kleinen Kunstsammlung eines Colleges tätig war, erzählte mir die Kuratorin eines Tages, dass sie ein verlorenes Gemälde hinter einem Bücherregal der Bibliothek gefunden hatte. Auf dem Bild war eine Frau zu sehen, die an einer Staffelei saß, malend. Es gehörte zu einem Genre, bei dem Männer häusliche oder intime Szenen gemalt hatten, meistens im industriellen Norden Englands. Ich war vor allem an dem Gemälde interessiert, an dem die Frau in dem Bild malte, was sich jedoch nicht in dem Bild offenbarte. Die malende Frau und ihr Gemälde konnten im häuslichen Bildraum weiter verweilen, während der staubige Rahmen, in dem sie gefangen sind, wieder einmal die Grenzen eines Kunstwerkes demarkiert.

Es ist vielleicht eine seltsame Anekdote, mit der hier in die Ausstellung von Sol Calero, Susi Gelb, Anna Schachinger und Sara Sadik im Rahmen von Various Others eingeleitet wird. Dennoch erinnere ich mich an dieses Gemälde im Gemälde, die gemalte Frau und die malende Frau, wann immer mir geschlechtsspezifische Konstruktionen von Häuslichkeit, Sozialität und Intimität in verschiedenen Kunstgenren begegnen. In Zusammenarbeit mit der Galerie Crèvecœur, Paris und Sophie Tappeiner, Wien, zeigt NIR ALTMAN vier Künstlerinnen, deren höchst persönliche Arbeitsweisen vielfältige „Bewegungen des Lebens“ hervorbringen. Wie Carla Lonzi einst sagte: „um einen kreativen Zustand in den Menschen auszulösen, um das Leben kreativ zu leben, nicht den Modellen gehorsam zu sein, die die Gesellschaft immer und immer wieder hervorbringt.“ Soll heißen, die jeweiligen Arbeiten verdrehen die traditionellen Achsen von Genre –auf allen Bedeutungsebenen.

Anders als Routine, die auf mich immer so wirkte als würde sie die transformierende Kraft standhafter Wiederholung neutralisieren, steht Iteration für schrittweise zunehmende Veränderungen, wenn wir Gesten wieder und wieder ausüben. Ein solcher, gradueller Bedeutungszuwachs wohnt der expandierenden Stoffsammlung in Anna Schachingers Malerei inne. Die verschiedenen Materialien treten in den Dialog, widersprechen und zelebrieren sich gegenseitig, während sie die Bildebene bestreiten. Die figurativen Elemente – der Löwe, das Kätzchen – kommen mit gleicher Unvermeidbarkeit daher, wie die expressiven Gesten aus Linien und blutenden Pigmenten. Indem sie sorgfältig ausgefranste Ränder und die Schlaffheit bestimmter Stoffe verarbeitet, überlagert Schachinger die Vielfalt der Oberflächen mit absurder Rationalität. Dadurch entstehen Objekte, die sich nicht davor verstecken aus „Dingen“ hervorgegangen zu sein, während sie gleichzeitig für eine neue Wertigkeit einstehen.

Die Qualität der Wiederholung im Sammeln von Objekten, dem Ausstellen derselben wieder und wieder, zeigt sich auch in Sol Caleros malerischen Arbeiten, die aus einer anderen Installation hervorgegangen sind, wo sie teil eines fiktiven Restaurantsettings waren. Ich bewundere die Gastronomie und ihr Hervorbringen einer bestimmten Atmosphäre, die es ermöglicht, uns temporär befreit zu fühlen von Verantwortung und Pragmatismus, eine ungehemmte Geselligkeit – bis auf die kleine Angelegenheit mit der Rechnung, natürlich. Die Malereien, jetzt gerahmt an den Wänden hängend, extrahieren eine Bildwelt, an die wir uns bei unseren Ausgehabenden gewöhnt haben. Deren Re-Kontextualisierung in dieser Ausstellung ist bittersüß, insofern da sie auf die Zeit verweisen, als Restaurants in ihren Aktivitäten eingeschränkt waren, aufgrund der Pandemie. Träume vom schlummernden Restaurant entfalten sich in Skizzen, die so schnell entstanden sind wie Gedanken, die den vereinsamten Räumen entkommen sind, um jetzt ihre Betrachter:innen in Galerien zu finden.

Sara Sadiks Video Khtobtogone ermöglicht einen intimen Einblick in die Geschichte von Zine, ein der maghrebinischen Diasporagemeinde zugehöriger Arbeiter in Frankreich. Die Handlung basiert auf Geschichten von Ahmed Ra’ad Al Hamid und Brian Chiappeta, und zeigt wie sich Zine konfrontiert sieht mit qualvollen und widersprüchlich Erwartungen, die seine Zukunft betreffen. Sadik zeichnet ein Bild von Zine unter Berücksichtigung von Spannungen, die auf Rassismus, Klassenzugehörigkeit und Geschlechterrollen fußen, und thematisiert insbesondere, wie sich diese dem Kontext nach unterscheiden. Zines Liebe für seine männlichen Freunde ist anders als die Liebe, die er für die Frau Bulma empfindet, obwohl er in beiden Instanzen dieselben Worte benutzt, um seine Gefühle zu artikulieren. Die Bildsprache ist mit Grand Theft Auto V erzeugt, wodurch dem Graphischen ein unpersönlicher Touch inhärent ist, der Zines Verletzbarkeit auf andere Figuren übertragbar wirken lässt, trotz seiner Sprachspezifik, den kulturellen Markern und seiner persönlichen Beziehungen. Die leichten Glitches (Störfaktoren) im Bild überspringen das hypermaskuline Verhalten und die Macho-artige Gewalt, die sonst typisch sind für GTA- Spielverläufe. Zine hingegen beschreibt von Liebeskummer geplagte Nächte und seinen Drang nach Besserung, seinen Wunsch, von anderen in positivem Licht gesehen zu werden.

Carla Lonzi erzählt, wie sie zur Kunstkritik gefunden hat: „Ich kam bei der Kunst an, als ich meine religiöse Erfahrung hinter mich gebracht hatte, und festgestellt habe, dass man bei der künstlerischen Erfahrung keinen Glauben braucht...wodurch ich aber ein analoges Bedürfnis stillen konnte.“ Die ambivalente Beziehung zwischen Kunst und Glauben scheint auch hinter Susi Gelbs Arbeiten für die Ausstellung zu stehen, vor allem hinsichtlich alchemistischer Referenzen. Wenn Glauben von Kunst nicht gestillt wird, welches analoge Bedürfnis ist denn da überhaupt? Vielleicht die Spannung im Unglauben? Der Gedanke daran, dass „Realität fake ist“ scheint mir eine gute Voraussetzung dafür zu sein, einen eigenen Zauber zu erzeugen. Gelb gießt flüssige Formen, die vor photographischen Seelandschaften treiben. Es scheint, als kämen diese Körper hinter dem Horizont hervor. Eine holographische Videoskulptur reproduziert die hypnotischen Bewegungen von Lava, die kontinuierlich fließt und neue Formen entstehen lässt. Die Referenz zum Flüssigen und Fließenden zieht sich durch Susi Gelbs Werk; die Unvermeidbarkeit von Veränderung, die sich im Bild der Wellen widerspiegelt, deckt die sublime Kraft der Wiederholung auf, die darin wohnende Möglichkeit, der Schöpfung und Zerstörung – egal woran wir glauben.

Beim Schreiben über diese künstlerischen Positionen, komme ich nicht drum rum, mich in der Rolle des Mannes zu fühlen, der die Frau gemalt hat, wörtlich hinter ihrem Rücken. Carla Lonzi, die sich schlussendlich von der Kunstkritik abwandte, um politisch-feministischen, expliziteren Aktivismus zu betreiben, beklagte die „verlogene“ Beziehung, die Kunstkritiker zur Kunst hätten: sie „überschreiten die Grenzen in ein Gebiet, an dem die Menschheit mit Tiefgang geschuftet hat, geben ihren Senf dazu und kehren dann wieder zurück zu ihren engstirnigen Angelegenheiten.“ Je mehr ich schreibe, umso größer scheint mir die Gefahr, dass sie recht gehabt haben könnte. Wenn sich aber die Wiederholung einer Praktik mit sich selbst überlagert, erkennen wir vielleicht die Möglichkeit der Neuinterpretation, beim zweiten, dritten oder vierzigsten Mal. In dieser Weise zeigt diese Ausstellung, wie wichtig es ist, das Leben kreativ zu gestalten; während wir wiederholen, beibehalten und durchhalten, uns immer mal wieder erlauben, überrascht zu werden, von den Dingen, die heute passieren, einfach nur weil sie gestern auch schon passiert sind, und vielleicht morgen ja wieder passieren. --- Text - Miriam Stoney

Text von Miriam Stoney

<- DOWNLOAD PDF ->

Mark